Tag Archives: pesticides

Plants and invertebrates face increasing applied pesticide toxicity

Increased efficacy of pesticides comes along with decreased applied amounts in agriculture – but does this translate to lower risks to non-target species? The answer is NO, if you ask scientists at the University of Koblenz-Landau who recently published a study in Science assessing changes in the use of 381 pesticides and toxicity to eight non-target species groups over the course of 25 years. In our blog, the authors explain the shifts in applied pesticide toxicity they found, and which species are increasingly at risk.

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Water Quality in European Surface Waters – A Spatial Complex (Part 3)

Jakob Wolfram talks about how water quality in Europe is affected by spatial factors and how they contribute to quality impairments for different organism groups. His research on “Water Quality and Ecological Risks in European Surface Waters – Monitoring Improves While Water Quality Decreases” is published in Environment International.

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Amphibians are at risk from pesticides in agricultural landscapes

In this post, Christoph Leeb and Elena Adams summarize three new papers on the effects of pesticides on amphibians, which will inform ongoing developments of pesticide testing and environmental risk assessment strategies in the European Union.

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Save the date: SystemLink virtual conference on aquatic-terrestrial linkages on January 28 & 29

The SystemLink graduate school at the University of Koblenz Landau, Institute of Environmental Sciences (iES), will host a free virtual research workshop on the topic of anthropogenic alterations of aquatic-terrestrial linkages.

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“Daily Poison, Pesticides” – New popular science textbook

In this post, Carsten Brühl introduces a new popular science book by Johann Zaller, titled “Daily Poison, Pesticides – an Underestimated Danger”. The book sheds light on the usage and environmental effects of pesticides, written for scientists and non-scientists alike.

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